Tag Archive | drawing cars

Getting Technique-cal

Pencils to pixels

Over the past few months, I’ve been plotting and planning a video tutorial series, and getting that rolling. Wanting to make it as in-depth and as close to real-time as possible, it’s become a monster indeed.

The plan has been simple: Show the workflow, the art, the technique an all of the warts and whatnots that go into creating a rendering or illustration the “Problem Child Kustoms Way.” Suffice to say, it’s been a ton of work thus far, but very rewarding and eye-opening for me, both from a technical standpoint and as an artist. I’ve realized many key things about my work, as well as just how often I let a few f-bombs fly. Crazy how that can go.

how to render in adobe illustrator

I thought that it might be fun to show a few in-the-moment screen grabs from a couple of pieces here, as they represent a lot of what goes into these works. There’s a ton of hidden stuff and work involved in making vector art look like, well, not vector art. Not that the purpose of my technique or approach begins and ends with that in any respect… I enjoy the fact that I can use a program like Adobe Illustrator to continue creating, even after my hands have given out as they have. It’s a mater of holding on to the style I had developed before going digital, and the incredible tools afforded by the software to push it that next step. A melding of man, will and machine… Funny how those can come together so organically, while often being thought of as being so different.

Some pieces like this big rig tend to get very involved. While working on a segment highlighting graphics and paint, this particular illustration spent a ton of time under the microscope, not only for its very involved process, but because I had to make vector paths appear more like candy paint, with all sorts of transparent and translucent qualities, reflecting and refracting light. Fun times…

speedco-csm

…and how it all comes together:

speedco-csm2

I had taken some time as well to show how to create realistic reflections using only the pen tool in Illustrator, which offers a lot of control when altering reality just a bit:

Reflections in Illustrator

And, of course, rendering from paper and pencil all the way through to digital:

tucci-coffemakerL

…covering glass, paint, shading and more using only the pen tool in Illustrator (no gradient meshes, brushes or presets… Just hands-on dirty work).

vector rendering

Look for more soon, and be sure to check out my website at www.problemchildkustoms.com for more tutorials and sneak peeks. Thanks for looking in, and feel free to hit me with any questions, comments, suggestions…

Drawing FURY-ously

Hey guys. It’s been a while, and I apologize for that. Today, I’d like to roll out another tutorial, this time, drawing a slick, slammed Fury. This will be an analog (or “traditional”, whichever you prefer) piece, so bust out the pencils, paper, and markers of your choice (I’ll be using Copics, but virtually any marker will do here), and get drawing!

Laying out the guidelines… At this stage, some loose lines to place the key parts of the composition are all that’s needed. Perspective lines give us an idea of where things will be placed, and give a general feel for scale and proportion as well.

car drawing tutorial

I start to tidy-up the car at this point, bringing in a little marker to darken-up the shadow areas, and make permanent those lines I wish to keep:

vehicle rendering tutorial

Blocking-in some gray tones. Just some loose grays to start giving the piece some depth. Key here is deciding which forms will recede in space, and which will be left up front. I also spend a little time defining the car’s shadow:

marker rendering tutorial

Cleaning-up some of the stray sketch lines, and adding some color to block in some lighting for later. I like the work to appear translucent, versus having just color planted atop more color (which can get awfully muddy-looking), so a little color washing at this point pays off HUGE later on:

how to draw a car

I bring in some color to the car at this stage, tightening-up the shading and lines… While the whole image is loose, I like to have certain areas (like the wheels) show a bunch of detail, to draw the eye in and around the work:

car drawing tutorial

A ton of time spent blocking-in color, and implying some brick on the storefronts. Blending is the key at this stage, and using it in a restrained manner can help to give not only a nice, loose feel, but make the lighting and shadow appear more natural, versus blocked-in and forced. I tend to work from the lightest to darkest areas in stages, moving back over and into those areas that need richer or darker tones:

final rendering

This is another ‘static’ tutorial, meaning no video. I thought it best to present a few basic tutorials in this way to give you a reference, without any distractions, or need to search for a particular step. This just seems a better way to get you up to speed on the essentials, before we move full-steam into the more advanced tools and techniques. It’s a quick overview, but take your time, and work on controlling every stroke you lay on the page. It’ll pay off in the end.

Art of the Hot Rod: Weaving a Tale With Cars

street machine illustration

Since childhood, I’ve been fascinated with cars, photography, and motion pictures. Cars were something I had no control over being into. I was simply born with that gene. On my build sheet, someone checked the RPO for Car Nut, and the deal was sealed. But photography… capturing a moment in time… man, that sparked something in me. And motion pictures? Well, damn. Telling a story with a photo narrative, and having it grab that in an animated sequence? I was sold.

I studied Fine Art, and honed skills like drawing and painting, design… And then went further, studying animation and digital art, and finally working to apply these diverse techniques for creating imagery in one piece.

The majority of my commissioned work happens to be renderings, which, by nature, require strictly static images to supply some direction for a project. As a fan of both animation and painting, as well as someone who has always enjoyed writing and the thrill of crafting a narrative, well, you can imagine the turmoil which surfaces each time I grab a pencil or stylus or brush.

40 merc rear
There’s always the drive to take the subject that extra step… to get something to move in the image, to put it over the top. Some time back, I experimented with backgrounds in my renderings that included scanned and reworked splashes and splatters. They had that ‘frozen in time’ feel I was looking for, and allowed me to play with contrasting colors to get some visual pop and movement… And that laid the groundwork for future pieces, sparking inspiration to play with textures, atmosphere, and finally, crafting a story.

The idea, in and of itself, was straightforward. Simply create the setting for the story, and shove the car in there. Right? No… in my world, things have to be a bit more complex when weaving the tale or painting the image. I began taking notes on cars I’ve drawn, would like to draw, and those I simply find interesting.

I began to imagine where these cars might turn up… who would drive them.

Why they would drive them there in the first place. Inspiration began to strike.

merc story illustration

There was a way to connect all of the images, but have these little sub-plots running, and even include a car in each of these unique stories. I’d build the stories individually, but have some underlying theme carrying throughout an
entire series, or even a few series.

Game on.

The example above, showing that blue Merc was bouncing in my head for some time. I always saw the car as a bit sneaky-looking, even when designing it. I imagined the kind of guy who might drive it, where he’d go… inventing little stories as I sketched ideas and details, keeping those notes handy.

v2-boxster

Right on about this time, I took on the AutoWeek Magazine/Rad Rides by Troy 2012 calendar project. Twelve cars to be illustrated, creating some bad-ass, modern hot rods from new cars. Here it was: the opportunity to play with narrative, and work to tie a dozen cars, all different in their inspiration and beginnings, but having some underlying story, a connection that went just a step beyond simply being some cars I was designing and illustrating for a calendar.

custom miata

The challenge became finding a way to make them all work together, yet retain some unique identity. Then it hit me. A calendar helps to mark the passage of time. I would mark some passage of time with the cars, as well. I would break the year down as if it were simply one day. I’d tweak the colors to represent the cycles of the sun, the passage of seasons, and yet, do it in a way that presented itself as a single twenty four-hour span. I’d move around a fictional region, from urban to dry lakes and everything between, and pass time from dawn through nightfall. Each vehicle needed a place, a setting to complement its purpose, and needed to make sense with that particular time of day.

What a can of worms that was. Light shifting throughout the day, atmospheric changes filtering intensity of light, I had even considered altitude of each setting, plotting how the air molecules might scatter the light. I became almost obsessed with color and light theory. But I managed to pull it off.

But the work that led to that grand project only sparked a deeper need to weave some tales. I experimented relentlessly. I dragged old work out of the archives, and played and tweaked and painted and scanned and printed and brushed and sketched and repeated the process for months. I was on to something.

…of course, there were a few pieces that played to my inner nerd:

zombie hunter van

We all need to hunt a zombie or two now and then… and at this point, I was finding ways to craft an entire tale in one shot.

There’s a LOT going on in this image, from the lighting to the smoke and atmosphere to texture… But the key was in making it look simple.

Note taken:When creating the narrative, find the central theme, and work to craft a setting that slips the drama in almost secondary to the drama created by the car. One should brace the other, and tell the tale, but not completely. Leave a few gaps in the story. Allow the viewer to ask ‘how did the vehicle end up at this particular moment, and what’s around that corner?’ Misdirect on occasion, especially on two-panel works. This could be fun.

My little notebook speaks to me sometimes, and those late-night scribbles tend to be correct more often than not.

Additional note: Sleep-deprived self may be smarter than well-rested self. Definitely finds farts funnier.

Oddly enough, the images didn’t make it into the final calendar in the order I had hoped and presented, but the idea seems to have played off well enough. I was approached by people who caught what was going on, and were excited to have felt a part of the narrative and understood the story. Now we were moving into part two of the plan:

Involving the viewer in the tale.

After all, as a kid, I loved the Choose Your Own Adventure books. Brilliantly written in that you felt a part of the action, and a certain excitement at uncovering some side story or alternate ending that your friends may have skipped over. It was that personal involvement, that ‘look what I just found’, eureka moment that attaches someone to the art, versus simply saying ‘wow… neat wheels’.

cab's coupe

I began to find ways of making the cars live and breathe. Illumination of lamps, the light trace of exhaust… Those little things that allow your mind to fill in the blanks, to become a part of the story. After all, I wanted the work to become an almost captured memory. And memories play off of little sensory grabs: A scent, a picture, a sound, the feel of light mist as rain begins to fall on a cool evening. I wanted to offer art that was something more than simply a car in a picture. It needed to be a conversation piece. It needed to spark someone’s imagination much the same as it did mine.

kustom desoto

I had always made a habit of photographing odd things while on trips or vacations. I’d see things that interested me: Cobblestone streets, a tree, a lamp post, an alley, a door… I had a large archive of reference photos to draw from, and began to arrange and categorize them, and make notes, find uses for them. I’ve always hidden little things from my past in my work, from license plates to buildings, and so-on. I have even gone as far as sketching a city map, designing the layout of the main streets, side alleys, parks and neighborhoods where my tales would play out. A series was born.

buick

Like any tale, the players (both main and secondary) would cross paths. There might be drama, there may be harmony, but there would be interaction. I began to work with environments where I could present multiple angles and viewing points. I found that I could move this fictional camera around, and find another car hiding in the shadows, or show it from the reverse, and complete one small tale in two images.

drawing cars

Case in point, that Merc from earlier:

kustom merc

First frame: the car in an urban, industrial environment. A simple photo-perfect opportunity? Sure. But when we see the rear view, we learn that the car’s owner is on a late-night visit to a lady friend. Each piece can stand alone… but together, we have a tale!

Taking this idea a big step forward, it only made sense to completely narrate the scene, and add as much drama as possible:

tense2

…and the polar opposite:

western effie

…a quiet moment before that storm we see brewing in the background. A little foreshadowing of drama can have just as much impact as an all-out gunfight. All of those years spent studying Hitchcock are paying off: The trick isn’t always in heaping the big stuff into someone’s lap… occasionally, all you need to do is hint at it.

That all said, I hope you enjoyed a little back-story to the, uh, stories I’m trying to tell in the art. Look for more in this series soon, as well as prints… and a behind-the-scenes look and tutorial on making one of these. Thanks, as always for your time, and I look forward to your questions, comments and more!

Think FAST.

hemi A-100

Like any good disease, the car thing is hereditary, I’m positive of that.

Think Fast.

If I were to ask you to name the first car that really did it for you… the one car that sparked your interest in hot rods or cars in general, what’s the first car that comes to mind for you? I’ve asked this question a few hundred times in my life (conservative guess) to folks I know or meet in the car game, and one overwhelmingly consistent answer seems to be a Hot Wheels car (followed closely by either a neighbor’s bitchin’ street machine, a local kustom, and the always-present magazine feature car)

For me, there was always some interest in cars. It was and is in my blood. I’m convinced that it’s genetic. My kids love cars, and always have from the start. My parents were rabid car fanatics, and it was working with my Dad on weekends and summers that provided me with the skills to earn my own living during and after school in the parts and service side of the industry.

To look back on there being that one car that really sparked it all for me would be impossible. However, to pinpoint that one car that set in motion my love for a certain style of car, all memories lead back to my die cast car cases that I prized as a little kid.

hot wheels

It was in those cases that my imagination could just go haywire! Man… there was just unlimited potential in those vinyl, lift-out holders. Wild paint, huge engines, side pipes, mean, aggressive, almost profane stance… These were my inspiration. It was my time spent with these Hot Wheels cars that made me look at cars differently. Somewhere in my mind, a switch was flipped at that early age, and rather than just look at a car, I’d be mentally re-working it. Changing the paint, the body… altering the stance, just testing the limits of what could be done to make even the most mundane sedan riding alongside our car on the road into the baddest machine in the world. I’d escape into my own world of outrageous, fire breathing motor madness. And all was good in the world.

By the age of five, I was drawing a lot… I made it my goal to capture the mental images on paper, and tweak them from one extreme to the next. On paper, I could refine an idea, and learned the importance of stance, tire sidewall height to wheel diameter and wheel opening size ratios, the importance of color choices and more. I’d grab cues from these scale cars in my room, and just run wild. One idea would inspire countless others, and I’d go through paper as fast as I could get my hands on it. Where my neighborhood friends were content to collect and play with cars, I was happiest creating my own versions. I was hooked.

When there was a way to scrape together a couple of bucks, I’d save for more Hot Wheels cars, or, once I’d discovered the madness between the covers, well, it was CARtoons or nothing, baby, even replacing my beloved MAD Magazine (we’ll get into my Mort Drucker and Don Martin fascinations some other time). Between the automotive insanity in CARtoons and the occasional Dave Bell cartoon I’d spy in the magazines at the barber shop, I just knew that there were others who shared my twisted fantasies and tastes. Guys like Trosley and Austin and Borden just pushed crazy physics and power to new levels, and Bell’s subtle tweaking and mastery of cartooned proportions folded my brain in exciting new ways!

dave bell poster  cartoons

Somewhere along the way, we all grow up, and our priorities change. We have things to worry about, like school, work, family… and in those changing time, we often lose sight of the little things we had as kids. The things that inspired creativity, filled our days and daydreams and got us excited for a ride in the car seem to take a backseat, and get lost in the day-to-day tasks we need to finish up. Our minds are clouded with lists, schedules, reminders…

We reach for techno-gadgetry to handle small tasks and make things quicker, and put our brains into overdrive, reserving those few down-times to have some television program provide entertainment for us. Quick wit gets replaced by repeating the one-liner from a sit-com, and creative tastes are inspired through advertising. Innocence and that “what if??” sense of adventure just seem to get swept under it all. We all go through it. I sure did.

I made a conscious decision some years ago, while driving in to my then cubicle-based land of employ. I resolved that morning to just let my imagination run wild on my 70-mile commute… Not to listen to the radio, or go over notes and schedules in my mind. Rather, I wanted to just stretch the right side of the brain, and see where it took me. I began looking at traffic with the same excitement I had in my youth. That econo-box next to me suddenly became this evil road racer, with IMSA-like bowed body panels and wild paint. The tow truck in the next lane took on some outrageous, CARtoons-like creation, with a huge blower and out-of-this-world size rear meats, with the tow boom swinging an over-sized, chromed hook madly behind. My own ride became a Mad Max-like, post-apocalyptic street machine, racing for the next fill-up. I had found my own nirvana again, and even the worst of days was made brighter. “Just like the old days”? Oh, Hell yes.

At lunch, on breaks, during meetings, conference calls, whenever, I doodled. I began drawing again after years of neglecting that once vital part of my days. I was drawing again! I was having fun with it, and it was going in a million new directions. I had re-discovered what it was all about so many years prior. The fun was back, and having absolutely no limits on what could be done on paper was a most welcome escape from what had to be done with paper each day.

wheelstander

Fast-forward a few years, and I was designing project cars for clients at night and on weekends, and managing them during the day at a new job. The work was taking on a realistic appearance out of necessity, but the wild style within still wanted to play. One day in late 2006, I let it out in the form of the A-Tona, which I sketched up for a Truckin’ Magazine Radical Renderings feature. This little Dodge A-100 has been the one piece of my work that gets me more emails, calls, letters and requests for re-prints than any other I’ve sketched. It’s just got that something that makes people grin, and everyone just seems to get it. It’s fun, it’s irreverent, it’s obnoxious… It sums up my earliest inspirations and daydreams in one bright orange, low-slung package, and looks like it just did something wrong… And, frankly, it doesn’t give a shit. It’s my inner child, street machine-style.

…and how about cars in action?! Here’s a little taste of what I’m playing around with (it’s an intro for some upcoming drawing tutorials):

Drawing Cars: It’s All in the Details

rendering chrome

An obsessive-complusive personality can be an advantage.

Salvador Dali once observed that “the true painter must be able patiently to copy a pear while surrounded by rapine and upheaval.” There’s a guy who knew how to put a thought on paper. And you know, it’s not just the turmoil and distractions of daily life that can throw off some artistic concentration, to me, anyway, there’s the constant temptation to get radical with every inch of the paper when drawing, and skim over some little details that could truly test my patience and skill.

Occasionally, the pens take on a life of their own, and the ink and pixels are flowing at an alarming rate, and the piece is getting a smooth, loose look, and all is well… but then something happens.

I just… well… stop.

Not because I’m tired, or unhappy with how things are going or anything like that… I just get drawn into some little detail. There might be a reflection that urges me on, or some tiny curve or indent or character line on whatever I’m drawing that makes me take an almost unholy interest.

…and this is where it all goes haywire.

You see, in my line of work, time is the enemy. There’s never enough of it. You can only create so many pictures in so much time, and time keeps slipping away from you. Oh, sure… you go at the day with the greatest intentions, but by noon, the day’s half gone (or even less on some more marathon days), and you’re three hours deep in rendering headlamps or hair.

Suddenly, the sun’s gone down, the DVD player’s been looping the menu for King Kong’s special features for three hours, the coffee is room temperature, the wife is mad, the kids are sound asleep, the dog is dancing around with crossed legs and floating teeth, and you’re… well, you’re adding digits to some gauge panel on an interior rendering. A detail that almost no-one will ever even see… but, by golly, they need to be there!

rendering lightsWhat drives me to do this, day in and day out?

Beats the shit out of me. I enjoy hiding the tiniest of details in a piece, and enjoy the heck out of it when anyone finds them or comments on it. But, it’s not about the recognition. For a while, I believed that it was. “Wow, Brian, you’re shouting ‘PLEASE LOVE ME!’ by drawing lug nuts and lamp filaments, you douche.” That wasn’t it, though. It was something else… something, well… More personal.

I was deriving a HUGE amount of satisfaction for the challenge of it all. It became a game with me. How far could I take a piece? What miniscule, insignificant detail could I make look cool, without attracting too much attention to it… Yet, if it went missing, would leave everything out of balance and unfinished-looking?

Again, on the flip-side, it’s this obsessive attention to detail that costs the extra hours… but, in the light of perceived value, I’m throwing in some hefty bonus features, and that, in some warped way, makes the cold meals and other, assorted lost time well worth it.

digital gauges  1950 merc dash

I mean, it’s fun to see a cool picture, but if you dig a bit deeper, does it still hold up, or is it a lot of smoke and mirrors? To me, it’s far more entertaining to see the little stuff that makes it all look, in the case of cars, anyway, put together.

fender flags

One of the greatest bits of knowledge I was ever taught was to observe.

Not to simply look at a subject that I’d be drawing, or even to study the nuances, angles, curves and so-on… but to pay attention to where it existed in nature (or within its plane of view), and, most importantly, how it interacted with the forms and objects around it. Precisely how it played off of the things around it. That little nugget of know-how permanently warped my sense of drawing, painting, artistic creation… even how I listened to music. It was the equivalent of telling an OCD-afflicted person to watch out for cracks in the sidewalk when walking on the wrong side of the street. I latched onto the idea, and never have been able to let go. For better or worse, it’s part of me.

It has its advantages:

rendering trim

I mean, man… it’s those little things, those weird, small details that bring a drawing up from just a few lines to some cohesive design… that’s fun to look at.

OK, so what’s the point here? To note how much crap I can pack into a sheet of paper that’s pretending to be a car? Sure. I mean, no… it’s a bit bigger than that.

I’ve been slowly making time to create some tutorials on drawing cars, and while handling the basics is cool, and probably the most logical place to start, I was noticing something… well… missing (see s trend here?). I took a step back, and realized that what was missing:

Actual content.

I mean, sure, you can teach someone to draw, or to paint, or to use software… but it’s those little life experiences that make it come together. Teaching someone to observe, and then to apply what they’ve seen, what they’ve witnessed in some way… that, my friend, is the shiznit. The part when it all comes together, and someone begins to develop a unique style, versus simply mimicking another, or rote-learning some pen strokes.

custom car drawing

With that in mind, I started to re-teach my kids to draw. To listen to music, watch film, read… and, even better, to create with an emphasis on the harmony of what they are doing and the things that are going on around them and their work. Hell, I’d be stoked if they mowed the lawn in interesting patterns and cut the wife’s plants into topiaries resembling mythical creatures locked in battle over the weeds they strategically left behind. Then again, perhaps I’m reading a bit deep into things here.

t-shirt design

I want my work to be a constantly evolving entity… To be a little more than the sum of its parts. And, perhaps more importantly, to pass that idea forward in the tutorials, and inspire someone to push themselves in the same way… How cool would it be to not only push an artist in their art, but have that very act come back and do likewise?

I really want to see my art pack even more detail. If there’s any truth to the old saying that the devil’s in the details, then I want my work to become some sort of twisted, demonic state of Mardi Gras, complete with a never-ending exchange of cool visuals for strings of “wow, I never noticed that before!”.

Here’s hoping I can finish up some tutorials, perhaps inspire a budding artist or two, and who knows… get to bed before dawn, or eat a warm meal sometime soon…

Drawing Unplugged

Fact: Your rendering style will inevitably be determined and recognized by your unique talent and drawing skill… or by the software you bought. Not a tough decision to make.

When it comes to creating something, it pays to know a little bit about what you are aiming to make. With illustration, namely vehicle renderings, it’s not only helpful, it’s imperative. After all, how can you visually describe something if you don’t understand it?

Taking that a step further, knowing the tools and mastering their use will only make the work that much better. I’m going to share a bit of what I’ve learned. Granted, it all starts somewhere, and to me, the most important part of being an artist is developing a unique style, a way to have your work stand out. Even if you trace a Picasso, it will have your own style integrated somewhere, so why not just do it in way that is all yours? If thirty people all use the same filter on a photo, you have thirty filtered photos that all look alike. Boring!

That said, for this tutorial, we’re working on drawing, using your own abilities, and I’m simply guiding you in applying those abilities in the methods I use. They may not be for everyone, or they may be the spark that gets you rolling. In any event, I’ve been asked to break-down the technique I use, and here it is.

Any drawing should start with an idea. Hopefully you have one of those. I’ve decided, for the sake of this introductory tutorial, that I’d run with a 1950 Chevy pick-em-up… Coincidentally, I happened to keep step-by-step images from the original drawing… lucky you!

Hopefully, you have some basic knowledge of drawing, as these won’t be entry-level tutorials here on this particular go-round. If, however, you do need some help with the basics, grab a copy of the DVD Special Edition of How to Draw Cars Now. The tutorials included will have you swinging some lead in no time! If, however, you’re ready, let’s nail the basics.

First step: Grab some reference material. Unless you know the subject of your sketch by heart, well, you’ll need a point of reference for the overall scale, proportions, dimension and details. Lacking the real car or truck, photos and books are your best friend.

reference material

I like to give my drawings a little bit of energy and action… so I’m going to work with the truck’s overall dimensions, and tweak the proportions just a hair on this one… I’m going to freehand a quick box layout, just to get an idea of where everything will “grow” on the paper. Working with a standard 2B pencil, I’m going to keep everything very loose… Don’t worry if all of your lines aren’t perfect, or if all points intersect or not… we’re simply figuring out where this beast will live on our page, and get the stage set for our drawing.

box method for drawing

From here, let’s start figuring out where the main parts of the truck go, with reference to our general boxes.

creating panels

Think of it like sculpting. At this stage, we’re simply removing everything from those first boxes that isn’t a ’50 Chevy. Essentially, we’re laying in some guide lines to start fleshing-out the truck. We’ll do this in a few passes:

adding features

Let’s look to our reference material, and begin rounding the boxes to match the correct profiles. I tend to work freehand at this stage, and will break out the sweeps and French curve later to tighten-up the radius on all corners… but for now, we’re keeping things loose:

adding detail

I’ve used the sweep a bit here, tightening-up those corners just a bit, but not quite completely. I’ve also begun to block-in some areas to delineate where the grille openings will go, simply because I want to be sure that everything is staying true to scale. In my opinion, there is little worse than screwing up the scale or proportion in a rendering. Cartooning is the place to go wild… for project cars, keep it grounded in reality to help your client and builder…

using scale in drawing

We’ll start cleaning-up some loose, stray lines at this stage, trying to keep everything clear, and prevent confusion as we start to lay in a couple of details. This leads me to a VERY IMPORTANT TIP:

Observation is your BEST FRIEND. Pay attention to details, and, possibly even more important, observe where lines and points intersect. Get an idea of where one line is in relation to another… think in terms of “if I put THIS body line HERE, where does that trim part line up, and will it be in the right place on my sketch?”

We’re going to start tightening up the lines and overall sketch at this point, so try to keep your lines deliberate… but don’t become afraid of allowing them to flow, and vary in pressure and stroke. Line weight is where the real secret to a lively drawing lies… While we’re adding some observational power here, let’s drop in a little hint of the shadow under the truck… Consider where your main light source will be coming from, and drop a shadow on the dirt. I keep mine tight to the vehicle, especially when they sit low, simply to emphasize just how low they are. In this case, we have a light source coming in on the left side, front quarter, which will allow some fun shadows and highlighting later on to play in that rounded body

At this point, just roll with your own natural drawing style. Your style and technique are what will give your artwork a signature look… like a fingerprint for your drawings. Ever look at an artist’s work, and just know who drew it from the line work or the shading? Ever looked at a rip-off or copy of a know artist’s work, and just know it was a rip-off? You have a unique style, even if you’re just starting out. Celebrate that, and refine it. You’ll reap the rewards of that as your career progresses and people seek out your signature style. I’ve been working on mine for well over a decade, and am just appreciating it’s unique character.

Back to blocking-in some dark areas. Let’s get the shadow in place, and really start to define the grille openings. These are major pieces of the puzzle, and having them in place will help us to define the parts AROUND them, and will get everything where it belongs.

first shadows

Let’s bring our eraser out to play, shall we?

We’ll knock a little out of that shadow, and make some room for the wheels and tires… Think ahead here, and plan for reflected light from the ground onto your tire sidewalls… this will serve to anchor the car, and prevent it from looking as though it’s floating on some black cloud…

line quality

We’ll knock-out some more room for those wheels and, why not, some wide whitewalls… and dust a little kid-tone on the body. Why not? This will help

shading the sketch

Let’s continue, shall we? We have the basic lines dropped in, we’ve cleaned up some stray lines, and even started to describe some surface curves… Look at you! Keep it up!

From here, we’ll keep shading in those small areas that the light source is turning dark… Just imagine how a panel like that front fender, for instance, will drop a small shadow on the door… how the cab, where it’s wider than the bed, will drop the leading part of the bed into shade… And so-on, and just roll with it. Have fun at this point!

Remember: this is a work of art, and the goal is to have fun while describing something without words. You are in control. You can use shadows and highlights to emphasize a part of your drawing, or tuck it away to draw the eye… it’s YOUR call. (BTW– next tutorial will be all about using shadows and highlights, so stay tuned!)

roughing-in wheels

Note that I’m throwing in some wheel shapes here, as well… As I drop in a few more detail lines, I’m working the ENTIRE drawing at this point… building it all over to keep the look consistent throughout. By this point, I usually scan a drawing, and move to Illustrator, but, damnit, I’m having too much fun. And, again, that’s the name of the game: HAVING SOME FUN. When it strops being fun, it should all just stop, because it begins to look forced… and cold, and sterile and machine-like, and that’s not art. That’s rote production, and while it hyas a place, that place shouldn’t be in your sketch pad or even in your creative client work. This is the place to get everyone involved with the project excited and crystal clear on the direction. While that’s a HUGE order, it should be those things, no more and no less. And it all starts with how you sketch the subject. Everything else is being built from there.

With that in mind, let’s place a few guides down to plot where our shadows and highlights will appear. Keep it loose, and keep it realistic, at least with reference to where the darker areas, lighter areas, and, possibly most important, where any light will reflect back onto a surface (whether off of adjacent panels, the ground, or something else that will appear in your drawing). This will help to “sell” the idea that your drawing is representing a three-dimensional object, versus simply being some lines on a flat plane.

plotting light source

Let’s continue to build those shaded areas, paying close attention to where light will bounce and fade, and perhaps not even reach with much intensity:

intensty

Let’s bust out that eraser again, and knock out some highlights… We’ll start to give ourselves some guidance for later on, at least for knowing where the light is really playing-off of the panels, and start making the fenders and hood and cab look more lifelike, and give them that rounded character! Again, just play in here, and use your reference materials to guide you on the general shapes and volumes you’re rendering… A light touch is preferable here, no doubt… We’ll blow in just a hint of color here, too, adding a little bit of a coolness to the panels. Visual temperature is something we’ll cover later on, but for now, just remember that this thing is, in reality, made of steel, and steel is often seen as “cold”. Let’s give reality a win here, and play up to it for a bit (and before we haul off and break all of the rules a bit further down the tutorial path).

colors

Continue building up the blue, bit by bit. Again, a light hand here will pay dividends in the end… While we’re here, let’s start blowing in just a HINT of orange.

TIP: Always work in complementary colors when and where you can. The contrast will create instant visual drama, and really add some “pop” to your drawing. Besides, how cool is it to get a little instant gratification when you’re neck-deep in a project?!

working in complementary colors

Continue to build the oranges and blues, and stop every now and then, and darken up some shadows, tighten any stray lines, and again, keep it loose overall, but start tightening your touch in areas that should be showing some edges. This will only help to reinforce the perception of the shapes later on, and prevent the finished piece from looking “drawn over”.

defining surface in the drawing

We’ll lightly touch on chrome and trim here. I say that, as I’ll cover rendering chrome and glass (and other reflective materials) further down the road… After all, this is simply an introductory tutorial… Just giving you a taste of what to expect.

rendering chrome

Let’s blow in some dark and light tones, simulating the bumper and window trim, and start making that big old grille look nice and shiny. The key here is almost thinking in reverse. Consider how the dark pavement under the truck will show up on the round bumper, and then consider that, no matter how dark the tarmac is, that light will still reflect off of it. So… Where logic says “it’s rounded, thus the area closest to our eye SHOULD be lighter”, we say “screw you, logic… that area will be somewhat lighter, but we’ll underscore that light area with a dark line, and go with another dark line just above it…”. Why? To mimic the pavement’s slight reflection on the chrome, and then to provide the eye with a reference point of the horizon. This looks much more natural in a drawing, and we’ll get into the how’s and why’s in a future lesson… We’ll now start to blow in some white (with a slight blue tint) to mimic the highlighted areas of our drawing. Be sure to mask the areas (i.e. the rest of the paper) with some Frisket or other material to avoid over-spray.

Adding the blue here may gray a few areas on you, but don’t worry… we’ll get the color to pop in a future step. The goal here is just laying in color as a guide.

masking the illustration

The idea, at this point, is to start showing where the light is hitting the panels… just play, and let your eye and reference materials guide you, if you’re not familiar or comfortable rendering light just yet…

We’ll start blowing in some more blues, a hint of green (let’s work that glass to look more, well, like glass, shall we?), and continue playing up the oranges (again, complementary colors!), and I’ve dribbled some, so I’ll make those into a nice ground texture, and, after masking (much more on that in the future), I’ve even blown some “behind” the truck. Anything to make it leap from the surface of the paper is a good thing here.

reflected light

Some cleaning-up, and we’re almost there… this is where the REALLY advanced touches come in… and we’ll cover them all as we put the series together for you. We’ll hit on highlights, hot-spots and reflections as shown in the image below… Here’s hoping you enjoyed this intro and over-view, and look for much more soon!

reflections and hot-spots

In the meantime, keep sketching, and observing. Study cars, get to know how light and shadow play off of surfaces, and what makes some colors appear warm, and others colder. Here’s a sneak-peek at where we’ll take all of this sketching and shading nonsense:

finished rendering

To reiterate, relax, observe, and always, always HAVE FUN! Stay true to the fun, and you’ll enjoy the time working, and your work will improve and show how much fun you’re having. This isn’t about layering one filter on top of the next, or trying to hide some referenced photo or model with cliche’d distractions and light flares… it’s about rendering a vehicle in a visually striking manner… making the most of what you have available observationally, and transcribing that in your drawing. More soon, and thanks again for looking in!

Catch you soon, and keep an eye out for the next installment… and check out my other drawing tutorial as well as my primer on line weight, and be sure to check in on my Facebook Fan Page! Thanks for reading and drawing along, and feel free to leave a comment or questions below…

%d bloggers like this: